Mind Over Heart Essay

Mind Over Heart Essay-66
The third is of a former bomber pilot telling of his transition from satisfied technician to guilt-ridden parent.Beyond the scarred American survivors, there are the draft card burners; the “deserters” fleeing to Canada, with an amnesty debate to follow; the hundreds of marchers urging the government to “give peace a chance”—and the patriotic “Victory in Vietnam” parades.

The third is of a former bomber pilot telling of his transition from satisfied technician to guilt-ridden parent.Beyond the scarred American survivors, there are the draft card burners; the “deserters” fleeing to Canada, with an amnesty debate to follow; the hundreds of marchers urging the government to “give peace a chance”—and the patriotic “Victory in Vietnam” parades.

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When Davis and his coproducer, Bert Schneider, received an Oscar for best documentary feature on April 8 of that year, controversy erupted again: at the ceremony, Schneider read a message of “greetings of friendship to all American people” from the Provisional Revolutionary Government of the Republic of South Vietnam delegation to the peace talks in Paris that were then going on.

Later in the proceedings, one host, Frank Sinatra, read a statement written by another host, Bob Hope, disclaiming responsibility “for any political references.” It was greeted by boos and applause, and the controversy was fueled.

Throughout, there are the hawks and the doves, the military men, the advisers, the public figures, and the statesmen. Most memorably, Daniel Ellsberg explains his own change of viewpoint, recalling Robert Kennedy’s assassination and breaking down briefly, overcome with emotion at the thought of what might have been.

In counterpoint, Davis offers heartbreaking exposition of what the Vietnamese are enduring, the horror and the sorrow and the devastation; the rage and frustration of the victims; the corruption and debauchery in high places and low; the steadfastness of exiled leaders.

Patton III describes his men as “reverent, determined, a bloody good bunch of killers.” A high school football coach tells his team to pray for victory, and another urges his to “win—kill ’em—win.” Edited down to 112 minutes from some two hundred hours of footage, this taut film is crammed with incident and anecdote, spiced with popular music and relevant Hollywood movie clips.

Particularly effective are three recurring interview vignettes.His is a thesis documentary, political and unashamedly compassionate, its righteousness and rightness its ultimate achievement.The historic outline of our involvement in Vietnam is presented in newsreel clips and interviews gathered in 19 in that country, the United States, and Paris.One is of a Massachusetts couple seeking a rationale—“Our system has worked better than any other”—for the loss of their son.Another is of a paraplegic veteran who bemoans his loss of patriotic fervor.There is the bewilderment of those who see themselves fighting a war of independence only to be besieged by a nation that won its own freedom from colonial rule barely two hundred years earlier.The last is Davis’s quintessential concern, the question of how we, initially a nation of revolutionary freedom fighters, evolved into one of compulsive winners, from battlefields to football fields, literalizing its civilian urge to “kill the competition.” The issue is addressed: Colonel George S."Smaller than the smallest, greater than the greatest, this Âtman forever dwells within the hearts of all. You, however, be as shrewd as serpents and innocent as doves.'" Despite these multiple approaches, the various spiritual traditions perceive the heart as the main organ of spiritual experience.When a man is free from desire, his mind and senses purified, he beholds the glory of the Âtman and is without sorrow." "In the space within the heart lies the Ruler of All, the Lord of All, the King of All. Hermeneutically, this identification has been deemed merely symbolical, related to the powerful pulsating force of the physical heart, providing blood to all living tissues in the body.In another sequence, a young Saigon businessman in his office describes himself as “a Johnny-come-lately, as far as war profiteering is concerned,” and talks of his agglomeration of American business franchises in anticipation of peace.Quick cut to what, for a second or two, looks like a factory worker polishing pink plastic.

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