Essays On John Keats

Essays On John Keats-51
Within the opening lines, Keats describes a knight, "Alone and palely loitering," and subsequently establishes the setting as dark and ominous through his description of nature's sickly state, with the lines, "The sedge has withered from the lake, and no birds sing," The use of natural imagery is continued throughout the poem, with vivid descriptions of, "Roots of relish sweet," and, "Honey wild, and manna dew," This marks a distinct change in mood from the gloom created by the earlier imagery, to magical, romantic imagery, as the Belle Dame tempts the knight.

Within the opening lines, Keats describes a knight, "Alone and palely loitering," and subsequently establishes the setting as dark and ominous through his description of nature's sickly state, with the lines, "The sedge has withered from the lake, and no birds sing," The use of natural imagery is continued throughout the poem, with vivid descriptions of, "Roots of relish sweet," and, "Honey wild, and manna dew," This marks a distinct change in mood from the gloom created by the earlier imagery, to magical, romantic imagery, as the Belle Dame tempts the knight.Keats recognises that love has the capability to cause pain.However, it takes several readings of his poems to fully understand his meaning behind certain metaphors and other figurative language techniques.

The knight is, "Lulled," to sleep, bewitched, and dreams of kings, princes and warriors who are, "Pale," have, "Starved lips," their mouths, "With horrid warning gaped wide," The reason for the beautiful woman being described as, "Sans Merci," is now apparent and with it, the poem becomes clear.

Keats' ability to express his abstract ideas is impressive, conveys them through a style that is clear and direct after thought.

"La Belle Dame Sans Merci," differs in both its ballad structure and narrative form.

Not only does this poem deal with concepts, such as death, transience, and the inexplicable power of love, it also contains powerful imagery that is initially unclear.

"E'en like the passage of an angel's tear / That falls through the clear ether silently," This remarkable and striking image is an extremely philosophical reflection on the struggles that accompany creating and appreciating timeless pieces of artwork.

However difficult the language Keats uses may be, his message is simple and clear.Life is a tough, life is a struggle, but despite this, human beings are capable of creating magical, immortal pieces of art, and this is exactly what negative capability means.This is proof that Keats' abstract ideas cause his poetry to be less clear, but the effort required to decode these conceptual ideas is rewarding.The key, for me, was to understand that Keats writes in figurative language.The, "Realms of gold," and the, "Goodly states and kingdoms," referred to in the octet are metaphors for great art.‘Keats desired to immerse himself in an imaginative dream world but also wished to play a full and responsible part in the world of painful reality.’ (Jack Stillinger) Do you think such a view of Keats’ attitudes in his poetry is justified?YOU ARE READING Non-Fiction English essays for people who need ideas, or who are stuck writing boring essays for school and are unsure of what to write.I feel that John Keats' poetry does present abstract ideas, however I disagree that his style is clear and direct.Keats, as a true romantic poet, believed that nature brought humans great happiness and solace in difficult times.John Keats' poetry is challenging and not always direct.Reading and understanding his work requires time, patience and effort. I found the abstract ideas in Keats' work both thought-provoking and stimulating, and relevant to my life.

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